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In this lesson, we will learn about chord inversions and how to build it. The whole idea of inversions is to play the same chord using different combinations of chord notes.

But why do composers make use of chord inversions? Basically, it will add richness to a chord progression, by creating interesting voice movements.

Chord inversions are also important because it will be easier for the musician to play from one chord to the other. We will see how to do it in a very clear and easy way.

Triad Inversions

The best way to understand the concept is starting with triads. Let’s use as an example the C major triad: it consists of the notes C, E and G, in that order:

When the chord is played with C as the lowest note, we say that the chord is in the root position. So, we play root, 3rd and 5th in that order.

Using the keyboard diagram:

Now let’s move the root note to the top of the triad:

Notice that now E is the lowest note of the chord. When we play a chord with the 3rd as the lowest note, we say that the chord is in the first inversion.

Using the keyboard diagram:

The order of the notes, in this case, are E, G and C. However, E will always be the 3rd of C major chord. Similarly, G will always be its 5th.

Let’s now also move the 3rd to the top of the chord. It will leave us with the 5th (G) as the lowest note:

When we play a chord with the 5th as the lowest note, the chord is in the second inversion.

Using the keyboard diagram:

The order of the notes now is G, C and E.

One important concept is that inverting a chord will only change the order of its notes. In the example above, we are always playing a C major chord, but in three different ways: root position, first inversion and second inversion. Each position will have a particular sound, but the chord is the same.

That’s it! In the next lesson, we will continue to learn interesting concepts about chord inversions.

Good productions!

 

 

 

On Line Music Courses from Pluginboutique.com